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In the Founder’s Corner

Americanist Principles
of
Proper Government
by
Scott N. Bradley
Introductory Column


In 1787, The United States of America stood at a crossroads.  Although victorious at war, the nation languished in crisis.  Inflation was rampant, economic development was stifled, public debt was at an all-time high, and growing.  The threat of enemy action within the nation’s borders loomed.  Political motivation clouded the judgment of the nation’s leadership—many of the nation’s foremost leaders jockeyed for prominence and power.  The nation’s leaders were bogged down and ineffective.  Debates raged which seemed to perpetually elude solution.  Ineffective is the mildest term that could be applied to the tone set by Congress.  Foreign powers examined every action the nation took, scheming to take advantage of every perceived weakness and flaw.  The citizens of the nation were deeply divided on many critical issues.  The nation was polarized by divisive opinions which split the nation’s personality into almost innumerable fragments.  The future of the nation looked dire, indeed!

In that day, The United States of America was a nation united in name only.  A miracle was needed to prevent its dissolution.  That miracle came in the form of the new national charter—The United States Constitution, which was signed and delivered to the nation on September 17th, 1787.

It is uncanny how the conditions noted in the above description parallel the nation’s current circumstances.  Today the nation again stands at a crossroads.  Although claiming victories at war, the nation languishes in crisis.  Inflation is rampant, economic development is stifled, public debt is at an all-time high, and growing.  The threat of enemy action within the nation’s borders looms.  Political motivation clouds the judgment of the nation’s leadership—many of the nation’s foremost leaders jockey for prominence and power.  The nation’s leaders are bogged down and ineffective.  Debates rage which seem to perpetually elude solution.  Ineffective is the mildest term that can be applied to the tone set by Congress.  Foreign powers examine every action the nation takes, scheming to take advantage of every perceived weakness and flaw.  The citizens of the nation are deeply divided on many critical issues.  The nation is polarized by divisive opinions which split the nation’s personality into almost innumerable fragments.  In so many ways the future of the nation looks dire, indeed!  In fact, an honest comparison between the conditions which existed in 1787 and today’s conditions testify that the risks inherent in today’s conditions vastly exceed those of the earlier day.

In addition to the aforementioned challenges, we face the morally repugnant burdens of rampant officially sanctioned abortion, a cancerous proliferation of pornography, addictive behaviors of all sort and substance, a broad acceptance of base and increasingly crude entertainment (so called), a growing perverse conception that America is “officially” a godless society which looks to the wisdom of man’s philosophies, and government programs, for salvation instead of the God who founded this great land.  A host of other onerous circumstances and conditions could be noted, but surely these must suffice for all who have eyes to see and ears to hear!

It is interesting to note that John Adams, the nation’s first Vice President, and second President observed that “Our Constitution was made only for a moral and religious people. It is wholly inadequate to the government of any other.”

And it gives one pause to consider that during the Constitutional Convention of 1787, George Mason stated: “As nations cannot be rewarded or punished in the next world, they must be in this.  By an inevitable chain of causes and effects, Providence punishes national sins by national calamities.”  

We must pray that we, as a Nation, have not passed the point of no return, and we now face only the imminent justice of an offended God!

As we inaugurate these columns, it is perhaps appropriate to state our purposes up front.   It is the intention of this column, and subsequent columns, to raise the level of understanding and commitment to the principles upon which this nation was established in the hopes that we may restore them in practice.  We will begin with a seven part series to introduce some of the base line principles which have been long-since forgotten in daily practice by the nation’s leaders.